how difficult is it to eat healthy?

The one thing that constantly bothers most of us is eating healthy. Hectic schedules have given way to convenience in food habits and cooking at home* seems to be on a downward spiral. This change as indicated in multiple reports has happened over few decades and not overnight. So, how do you make the best of the situation? How do you eat healthy when eating out?

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The mantra is simple – look for fresh, preservative free, food, with a balance of healthy carbs, lean protein, veggies and fats, add to that moderate exercise and you should be all set!

Fresh – fresh produce doesn’t contain the stabilizers and preservatives that help increase the shelf life of products. But the good thing about fresh is that there is always a churn and you end up getting food that has been prepared the same day – far healthier than something that has been lying on some shelf for weeks.

Healthy carbs – any whole grain is a healthier carb. A lot of diet regimes discount carbs almost entirely from their plans, which is because there is carb in almost every fruit and vegetable – some more, some less. So, apart from getting our carbs from pure sources (like rice or wheat based products), we can actually balance it out with adding veggies to the meal. Also, a simple switch from ‘white’ to ‘brown’ goes a long way; you get the benefit of added fiber and nutrients which are key to keeping a whole bunch of ailments at bay.

Lean protein – Chicken & Fish top the list here. While you do have only one variety of chicken…. Fish compensates with variety! Though, one thing that works for both is that they can be cooked in multiple ways and in reasonably healthy ways as well. Grilled, poached, baked or steamed – the list goes on. Red meat is a great source of protein but in moderation. There is a split view on eggs – great source of protein – can’t deny that, but the jury is still out on whether it is safe to eat very frequently. Fresh meats win over processed meats any day!

Veggies – Bright colored fresh veggies are the way to go. A great balance of vitamins and essential nutrients combined with fiber and anti oxidants. You sure can’t go wrong with a plate full of colorful veggies. The other good thing about them is the sheer variety and the freshness.

Fats – As corny as it sounds, the human body needs fats, good fats to keep functioning normally. Monosaturated fats found in Nuts and fish help in keeping the balance. Artificial fats are a big no-no… they single handedly manage to skew any balance.

We suggest moderation – smaller portions, regulated meal times and a moderate level of exercise.

 

Reference:

*http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2015/03/05/the-slow-death-of-the-home-cooked-meal

 

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